MRSA Infection

MRSA Bacteria Some germs that commonly live on the skin and in the nose are called staphylococcus or “staph” bacteria. Usually, staph bacteria do not cause any harm. However, sometimes they get inside the body through a break in the skin and cause an infection. These infections are usually treated with antibiotics. When common antibiotics do not kill the staph bacteria, it means the bacteria have become resistant to those antibiotics. This type of staph is called MRSA (Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus).

Anyone can get MRSA. Infections range from mild to very serious, even life threatening. MRSA is contagious and can be spread to other people through skin-to-skin contact. If one person in a family is infected with MRSA, the rest of the family may get it. The best way to protect against MRSA infections is frequent hand washing with soap and water.

For more information on MRSA, please check the following topics and web links:

MRSA Links

California Department of Public Health MRSA Information

Centers for Disease Control: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) Infections

MRSA Toolkits for Healthcare Providers, Schools, Childcare Centers and Shelters

Questions and Answers About MRSA (fact sheet) document type Adobe Acrobat PDF format

Living with MRSA (booklet) document type Adobe Acrobat PDF format

Guidelines for Reducing the Spread of MRSA in Non-Healthcare Settings document type Adobe Acrobat PDF format

Community-associated (CAMRSA)/Staph Infections: A Guideline for Athletic Departments document type Adobe Acrobat PDF format

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus for Athletes - What You Need to Know document type Adobe Acrobat PDF format

Skin Infections and MRSA Information for California Schools, 10-24-2007 document type Adobe Acrobat PDF format

A Parent’s Guide to MRSA in California - What You Need To Know document type Adobe Acrobat PDF format

Guía para padres sobre el SARM en California - Lo que debe saber document type Adobe Acrobat PDF format