Public Health

The mission of the Butte County Public Health Department (BCPHD) is to protect the public through promoting individual, community, and environmental health. This is achieved by providing a wide range of services in more than 50 programs including: women and children’s health, communicable and infectious diseases, planning for and responding to disasters, healthy and safe animals, and protecting natural resources while improving the environment.

Public Health Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program

The Butte County Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (CLPPP) conducts outreach and education about lead poisoning and provides nurse case management in the event of a lead poisoned child. Lead poisoning can be harmful to children effecting development and behavior. The good news is that lead poisoning is preventable. For more information about lead poisoning and to find out if a child is at risk, please contact the Lead Poisoning Prevention Program Coordinator at (530) 891-3012, (530) 538-6863 or 1-800-339-2941.

Learn About Lead Poisoning

Why is lead dangerous?

  • Lead can harm a child's brain.  Lead poisoning can make it hard for a child to learn, pay attention, and behave.
  • If you are pregnant, lead can hurt your baby.  Ask your doctor about a lead test.

How does lead enter a child's body?

  • Children under 6 exhibit a lot of hand to mouth contact.
  • Children put an item in their mouth that contains lead or has lead dust on it, such as hands, toys or food.
  • Children can breathe in lead dust.

When should your child have a lead test?

  • Most children who have lead poisoning do not look or act sick.
  • The only way to know if your child has lead poisoning is for your child to get a blood test.
  • Children in California on a publicly funded program such as CHDP, Medi-Cal and WIC are tested for lead at 12 and 24 months of age.  Some children over age 2 also need to get tested.

Where can lead be found?

  • Lead is in paint and dust inside and outside of homes and buildings built before 1978.
  • Lead is in pots and dishes that are old, handmade or made outside of the U.S.
  • Lead is in many workplaces-places where people work with radiators, batteries or do soldering or welding.  Places built before 1978 that are being painted to remodeled.
  • Products that you purchase or bring home, home remedies, make-up, some imported candies, toys and jewelry.
  • Hobbies such as fishing, bullet reloading and stained glass.

How to protect your child from lead

  • Hand washing often- before eating, after play, before nap and bedtime
  • House cleaning- wet mop floors, wet wipe windowsills, vacuum, wash toys and blankets
  • Do not let children chew on painted surfaces or eat paint chips
  • Make sure cribs, playpens, beds and high chairs are away from damaged paint
  • Do not use imported, older, or handmade dishes or pots for food or drink unless tested and they do not contain lead
  • Be sure that products you bring home do not have lead in them
  • Cover bare dirt outside home with plants, concrete, bark or gravel
  • Don't bring lead dust home from work or a hobby
  • Take off shoes or wipe them on a doormat before going inside
  • Never sand, dry scrape, power wash or sandblast paint
  • Feed your child healthy foods and snacks

A Healthy diet can help

  • Provide regular meals and snacks.  A poor diet or an empty stomach can encourage absorption of lead.
  • Vitamin C rich foods- oranges, tomatoes, limes, bell peppers, berries, papaya, jicama or broccoli
  • Iron rich foods- beef, chicken, turkey, eggs, cooked dried beans, fortified cereals, tofu, collards, kale and mustard greens
  • Calcium rich foods- low fat milk, yogurt, cheese, calcium fortified juices and cereals and dark leafy greens

  Visit the following brochures for additional information on protecting your children from Lead:

  • Protect your child from LEAD   English             Spanish
  • Keep your newborn safe from LEAD    English         Spanish



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 Contact Public Health - Right Pane

Butte County Public Health
Phone: 530.538.7581
Fax: 530.538.2164

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 Locations and Hours - Right Pane

Butte County Public Health
202 Mira Loma Drive
Oroville, CA 95965

Office Hours
Monday to Friday
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Except Holidays

 News & Events - Right Pane
Public Health Department

202 Mira Loma Drive
Oroville, CA 95965

Report a Health Emergency
24-Hour Line: 530.538.7581

Cathy A. Ravesky, Director
Mark A. Lundberg, M.D., M.P.H., Health Officer
Public Health Leadership Team